Eos
A Scholarly Society Dedicated to Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome

EVENTS


CANE Eos Reads: ‘The Anniad’
Mar
9
11:30 AM11:30

CANE Eos Reads: ‘The Anniad’

Eos reads CANE 2019.png

We would like to invite you to participate in our workshop at the upcoming annual meeting of CAAS in Philadelphia (Saturday, Oct. 6, 2:30 to 4:30pm), where we will be discussing Gwendolyn Brooks’ ‘The Anniad’ (1949). The event’s aim is to encourage classicists to incorporate texts by members of the African diaspora into their teaching and scholarship, to develop more inclusive pedagogy, and to work through perceived barriers to incorporating this material into the work of our field. Please go to this link (https://goo.gl/forms/EUr6VtQ21a40atND3) to sign up for the workshop and access the primary text. We will email questions that will guide our discussions to all subscribers.

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Lecture (Brown University): “This young man deserves special mention”
Nov
8
5:30 PM17:30

Lecture (Brown University): “This young man deserves special mention”

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“This young man deserves special mention:” John Wesley Gilbert at Brown University, 1886-1888

John W.I. Lee (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Thursday, November 8, 2018 5:30 pm

Rhode Island Hall, 108

Dr. John W.I. Lee is an Associate Professor at the UCSB Department of History. He studies the history of ancient West Asia with a focus on war and culture in the Greek and Achaemenid world from ca. 650-330 BC. He is currently writing two books: one about Civil War and Revolt in Achaemenid Persia; and another about John Wesley Gilbert (1863-1923), the first African American to attend the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the first African American to receive an advanced degree from Brown (Class of 1888).

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CAAS Eos Reads: ‘The Anniad’
Oct
6
2:30 PM14:30

CAAS Eos Reads: ‘The Anniad’

eos-reads-beige.png

We would like to invite you to participate in our workshop at the upcoming annual meeting of CAAS in Philadelphia (Saturday, Oct. 6, 2:30 to 4:30pm), where we will be discussing Gwendolyn Brooks’ ‘The Anniad’ (1949). The event’s aim is to encourage classicists to incorporate texts by members of the African diaspora into their teaching and scholarship, to develop more inclusive pedagogy, and to work through perceived barriers to incorporating this material into the work of our field. Please go to this link (https://goo.gl/forms/EUr6VtQ21a40atND3) to sign up for the workshop and access the primary text. We will email questions that will guide our discussions to all subscribers.

View Event →